Baker is beautiful

We’re biased. So don’t just take our word for it. Listen to author Joan Tapper, who named Baker City one of most beautiful towns in Oregon 2010 and 2011. Listen to Rand McNally, which voted Baker City among the top 5 most beautiful small towns in the US. Listen to USA Today’s Best of the Road, which also ranked Baker in the Top Five.

“In Baker City’s second year running for Most Beautiful we saw even more of what this quaint small town has to offer. While the Geiser Grand Hotel is still a main attraction with its historic building, trade mark clock tower, and highly acclaimed food, our visit included the Adler House, Thomas Angus Ranch, Sumpter Valley Railroad and Oregon Trail Interpretive Center as well.” Rand McNally Best of the Road

Some of Baker’s beauty comes from its award-winning historic downtown, which boasts more than 100 buildings on the National Register of Historic places. Due to the efforts of the local Main Street program the downtown is a vital active place with small businesses, galleries, restaurants and special events throughout the year.

People who live in Baker care about it deeply, adding to its attraction. The Baker School District is at the forefront of new educational initiatives aimed at improving the local economy. Baker High School, Baker Middle School, Brooklyn Elementary and South Baker Elementary are located in Baker City proper while two of the district’s smaller elementary schools, Keating Elementary and Haines Elementary, are located outside of Baker City itself in Baker County. The district also sponsors the Baker Web Academy and Baker Early College programs.

The Leo Adler Foundation is a great example of both Baker’s heritage and continuing commitment to community. Each year the foundation provides scholarships for students and funds for community organizations. As the foundation states, “Leo Adler’s gift to our community represents unimaginable generosity. He bequeathed his gift to us because of his intense love for this community, a love he demonstrated throughout his life.”

From the Blue Mountains to the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Baker County has been a place for people to stake their claims in life since the early 1860s. An area rich in cultural heritage and scenic beauty, Baker is wide open for discovery!

Thanks to Base Camp Baker for generous permission to use these photographs.